THE SALVATION ARMY WARNS OF BOGUS EMAIL APPEAL FOR JAPAN RELIEF DONATIONS, CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION


For those of you wanting to help The Salvation Army’s earthquake relief work in Japan, you can support our efforts in several ways. 100% of your funds will be sent  to The Salvation Army in Japan for their disaster response efforts.
  • Donate online at SalvationArmy.org
  • Call 1-800-SAL-ARMY
  • Text the words “Japan” or “Quake” to 80888 to make a $10 donation. (Please ensure that you respond “YES” to the Thank You message you receive or else your donation will not go through.)
  • By mail: Send your check, marked “Japan earthquake relief” to:

  •     The Salvation Army World Service Office
       
    International Relief Fund
        PO Box 630728
        Baltimore, MD 21263-0728

    Monetary funds offer great flexibility and enable local disaster responders to
    purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.
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View the Media Listings of Assistance Organizations Here!

Stay Updated with The Salvation Army NHQ's Blog Here!

View a Live Twitter Stream for #Japan, #Quake & #Tsunami Here!
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HONG KONG CONCERT RAISES MILLIONS FOR JAPAN DISASTER RESPONSE

April 15, 2011

Hong Kong: A concert broadcast live on television in Hong Kong raised more than HK$26 million (US$3.3 million) for The Salvation Army's earthquake and tsunami response program in Japan. The event was organized by internationally famous film star Jackie Chan and featured artists well known in Hong Kong and around the world.

The three-hour concert, called “Artiste 311 Love Beyond Borders,” took place at Hong Kong's Victoria Park. Stars taking part included actor and singer Andy Lau, actor Donnie Yen and singers from Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea and China. American singer Lionel Richie performed from Australia via satellite link, singing “Say You, Say Me.”

Hong Kong-born Jackie Chan told entertainment website Hollywood Reporter why he decided to arrange the concert: “For years my Japanese fans have made a great effort to raise money for my charity, to build schools in China and to help the victims of the [2008] Sichuan earthquake. It’s time for me to return the favor and do what we can to help.”

He personally paid for the plane tickets and accommodation for all the overseas performers.

All profits from the concert will be passed on to The Salvation Army. More than 300 Salvationists and Salvation Army staff from its Hong Kong and Macau Command took telephone donations during the event.

The exact use of the funds is still being decided but it is likely that much of the money will be used to supply emergency relief packs – including a 15-day supply of food and water, personal care and hygiene products and blankets – to people in areas affected by the earthquake, tsunami and by problems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station.

For photographs from the event please visit: http://bit.ly/g8T2wR

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THE SALVATION ARMY IN JAPAN CONTINUES TO OFFER ASSISTANCE TO PEOPLE IN NEED

April 8, 2011

Japan:Commissioner Makoto Yoshida, Commander of The Salvation Army's Japan Territory, reports that the country's recovery from a devastating earthquake and tsunami is “going well,” although he says that ongoing problems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station continue to cause “some uneasiness among the people.” He says that everyday goods, including fuel, are becoming easier to obtain and that around 70 per cent of roads in the disaster zone have now been reopened.

The commissioner adds that the search for missing people is proving to be difficult. Officials report that 15,000 people are still missing, in addition to the 12,000 people known to have been killed in the disaster. Around 166,000 people had to be evacuated from their homes.

The Salvation Army continues to provide assistance where there is a need.

More than 1,100 meals and other necessities were distributed in Sendai on 23 March. Treats were given to the 83 children who went to the distribution. Power and water have now been restored in Sendai so The Salvation Army is likely to end its distribution there, although it may continue to provide assistance to needy areas north of the city.

The story is similar in Yabuki-cho, where Major Kenji Fujii and Captain Kazuyuki Ishikawa met the mayor, who reported that many houses that look fine from the outside actually suffered significant damage and will have to be demolished. Recently installed water pipelines for agricultural usage were destroyed, leading to the loss of the next rice harvest – a significant part of the area's economy.

The Salvation Army emergency team left goods in storage, to be used as necessary. The community was also given a clear message that The Salvation Army would provide support in the future if requested.

At Iwaki-city, which is just outside the 30-kilometer exclusion zone from Fukushima, a team of seven Salvation Army workers distributed 500 hot meals and 6,000 bottles of water in response to a request from the director of the emergency response volunteer desk.

Kesen-numa – about 120 kilometers north of Sendai – was badly damaged by the tsunami. The corps officer (Salvation Army church minister) from Sendai contacted a minister in Kesen-numa and discovered that the community needs support. It has been arranged for two Salvation Army emergency teams to carry out daily distributions of food and other necessities from 12 to 15 April.

Thirty kilometers north-east of Kesen-numa is the coastal community of Rikuzen-Takada, which was badly damaged by the tsunami. A Salvation Army team distributed hot meals and water on 5 April. While there, team members investigated how the Army can offer further assistance.

Photos of The Salvation Army's response in Japan can be found on the International Headquarters Flickr site: click here to access.
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THE SALVATION ARMY IN JAPAN CONSIDERS LONG-TERM RESPONSE TO EARTHQUAKE

March 24, 2011

Japan: Salvation Army emergency workers in Japan report that the government disaster response is proceeding well and that most areas in need of assistance have now been reached. Salvation Army teams continue to provide vital supplies such as food and water in Sendai and also in Yabuki-cho, both of which are near Fukushima but outside the exclusion zone set up around the nuclear power plant. Yabuki-cho appears to be one of the few areas not yet reached by government help.

Some areas hit particularly badly by the disaster are still not accessible but Salvation Army workers understand that other non-governmental organizations are also not being allowed into these parts. The exclusion zone around the Fukushima Daichi nuclear power plant remains in place and local reports suggest the situation is improving.

As previously reported, bottled water has been provided to The Salvation Army's Japan Territory from Korea. The Salvation Army World Services Organization (SAWSO) in the USA is organizing a delivery of blankets and has arranged for samples of food packages to be sent to territorial leaders who will then have the option to order any if needed.

There has been a considerable financial response to The Salvation Army's Japan Disaster Appeal from around the world. The Japan Territory believes funds already available in-country will cover the costs of the current response and that money raised from around the world will enable a medium to long-term response. The territory is considering building temporary accommodation and providing household goods and equipment but these plans are still at the early stages.

Commissioner Makoto Yoshida, The Salvation Army's Territorial Commander in Japan, is grateful for the practical and spiritual support that has been offered from across the world.

He reports that commuters in Tokyo who were given food, drink and shelter at territorial headquarters on the night of the earthquake have sent letters of thanks, some including a donation for the relief work.

Photos of The Salvation Army's response in Japan can be found on the International Headquarters Flickr site: click here to access.

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JAPANESE SALVATION ARMY EMERGENCY RELIEF TEAMS SWING INTO ACTION

March 18, 2011

Japan: The Salvation Army's earthquake response in Japan is continuing its work despite difficulties caused by snow and the lack of fuel. A team that was set to head from Tokyo to the tsunami-hit north of the country had to delay its journey because of snow but has now made its way to Sendai, where a distribution will take place tomorrow morning (Saturday).

The three teams that carried out distributions in Sendai, Koriyama, Shirakawa, Fukushima and Mito City on Wednesday 16 March returned to The Salvation Army's Japan Territorial Headquarters in Tokyo [pictured below] to report on what they had seen and decide what should be done next. International Emergency Services worker Major Raelton Gibbs reports: 'The work that has been done is commendable – from feeding programs out of Salvation Army halls to the distribution of blankets, water bottles, bread and nappies (diapers).'

He says that Tokyo continues to feel aftershocks and admits that 'no matter how many you experience they are all a little daunting'.

The Salvation Army distribution teams are well aware of the concerns surrounding the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station and are staying clear of the exclusion zones.

Major Gibbs says he has been impressed by the response put together by The Salvation Army's Japan Territory. The fuel and weather problems mean that people have had to be flexible. He tells of one group that tried to get to Sendai but was unable to make it all the way and so met the needs of some smaller communities around Koriyama on the way back to Tokyo.

The focus is understandably on the immediate response but Major Gibbs says that longer-term plans are being put in place, such as the provision of cooking equipment when people return to their communities. As it often does in emergency responses, The Salvation Army will pay particular attention to communities that have been missed by the government and other agencies.

Photos of The Salvation Army's response in Japan can be found on the International Headquarters Flickr site: click here to access.

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A LETTER FROM JAPAN
American Salvation Officer Describes Life in Tokyo

March 16, 2011

Tokyo, Japan: Captain Christopher Marques is a young Salvation Army Officer (minister) who is from Decatur, Illinois, but is currently stationed at The Salvation Army’s Headquarters for Japan. His normal work is with the young people in Japan. Following are some excerpts from a message we received from him early on Wednesday Morning, March 16.
…Thank you for your prayers. They are perhaps the greatest gift we can use right about now. As you know, the country is still being shaken by aftershocks; even today we just felt a larger one after lunch. But so far they have not been near the level we saw on Friday I am starting to get used to the ground shaking a little bit on and off, but still am surprised by some of the frequent medium-sized incidents.

There is still a problem with the reactors that are critical and leaking in the Fukushima area (in-between Tokyo and the tsunami-hit area of Sendai). The immediate area surrounding the plant has, of course, been evacuated from a 30 kilometer radius.

For now, those near the affected area who have not been evacuated or staying in temporary shelters have been advised to stay indoors. In the rest of the country we aren't moving much since gas/petrol is hard to find…the fuel lines are still stretching for blocks for anyone trying to get their car filled up.

The power supply is being cut in various areas to save the whole electrical system from crashing. With subways and trains running reduced schedules, and cars being used less- many are either using bicycles, walking or staying home.

The stores are struggling to keep shelves full and some things are simply impossible to find—even for us trying to get food for the relief victims. Today was not quite as crowded or busy in the grocery/convenience stores.

Most of us here have thankfully been able to go to work each day and help manage the relief effort from our Tokyo office.

My boss has left to help support the first relief teams that are further north. He has training and experience with disaster situations, so he was a natural choice along with the rest of the group. However, he is very close to the reactor area helping with victims and I pray for his safe return.

Today, during our daily morning devotions, we sang Count Your Blessings, and that song really came alive as we thanked God for our lives, His protection, our basic needs being met at this time and just having shelter, clothing and access to some kind of food each day.

We appreciate your continued prayer support for the people here during this difficult time. May God bless you all back home and keep you hearts firmly connected to Him.

God Bless You,

Chris
The Salvation Army has had a presence in Japan since 1895 and is also mobilizing a significant international response to manage both immediate and long-term needs. Two experienced International Emergency Services workers have flown to Tokyo from International Headquarters in London to assist their Japanese colleagues. The Salvation Army's Korea Territory has arranged for the K-Water Corporation to provide 100,000 bottles of water to be sent to Japan – 30,000 bottles by the end of the week, followed by the rest within a short time; the Korea Disaster Relief Association will also be sending 5,000 first-aid kits.

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JAPANESE SALVATION ARMY EMERGENCY RELIEF TEAMS SWING INTO ACTION

March 14, 2011

Sendai, Japan: The Salvation Army in Japan has three emergency service relief teams operating in areas devastated by the earthquake and tsunami that hit the north-east coast of the country last week. One of the teams is assisting people who have been evacuated from areas where there is potential danger because of damage to nuclear power generation stations.

At this time there are no reports of any loss of Salvation Army personnel or damage to corps buildings.

Immediately following the earthquake and tsunami an assessment team was sent from Tokyo to Sendai (the city nearest the center of the earthquake). It took the team 20 hours to travel a journey that usually is accomplished in six hours.

Road and rail systems have been severely affected. There is a shortage of gasoline, with many gas stations closed and lines up to three kilometers long at stations that are open.

The disaster has affected a 2,000 kilometer north-south stretch of Japan. Official reports now state that more than 10,000 people are dead or missing.

Arrangements are being made for emergency service personnel from The Salvation Army International Headquarters (IHQ) to go to Japan to assist with the Army's relief effort.

A number of Salvation Army territories have informed IHQ of financial and prayer support for the Army's relief effort in Japan. The Salvation Army in South Korea has set aside the next four weeks specifically for prayer and fundraising for Japan.

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THE SALVATION ARMY RESPONDS TO DEVASTATION IN JAPAN

Monetary Donations Encouraged

March 11, 2011

Sendai, Japan: Early Friday morning, a tsunami slammed Japan’s eastern coast following a large earthquake which rocked the region. Early reports indicate extensive damage to property and significant loss of life.

Salvation Army personnel are assessing the damage and initiating recovery efforts. Word has been received from Japan’s Territorial Commander, Commissioner Makoto Yoshida. The Commissioner writes:

“It is reported that there are more than 60 dead confirmed so far and many more missing. The number of houses destroyed are not yet known. The most damaged city is Sendai which is about 400 km away from Tokyo. Still our building swayed tremendously. It was hard for us to keep standing. Many of us were really frightened. We are sending a team to Sendai tonight and start tomorrow providing the basic necessities as well as assessing the level of damages and what we can do from now on. Even in Tokyo the whole public transports stopped and many a commuters could not go home. We opened our hall on the ground floor of THQ building to those who could not go home. We were able to serve them with hot drinks and packed meals. Thank you for your interest and prayers.”

Currently, those interested in aiding the relief effort are encouraged to give monetary donations. Monetary funds offer great flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.

Bear in mind, it will be extremely difficult and expensive to ship in-kind donations overseas from the United States to Japan. It is more efficient for disaster relief agencies to purchase needed resources locally and for immediate distribution with the disaster area. The best way for U.S. donors to help Japanese disaster survivors is to make a cash donation. Please note that your local The Salvation Army continues to accept donations of used clothing, furniture and other items to support local programming. Please consider donating your used items to your local Salvation Army Thrift Store.

Since 1895, The Salvation Army has provided emotional, spiritual, and physical care to individuals and families in need throughout Japan. Currently, 81 active officers and 1,068 employees operate 57 church and community centers (Corps), 12 small social service stations (outposts), 2 hospitals, and more than 20 institutions serving children, seniors, the addicted, and other at-risk populations. Due to the Army’s extensive presence, it is unlikely that volunteers from the United States will be needed for initial recovery operations.

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8.9 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE AND RESULTING TSUNAMI STRIKE JAPAN

The Salvation Army Serving The Impact Area

March 11, 2011

Sendai, Japan: The Salvation Army in Japan is responding to the earthquake and tsunami that brought devastation to the north of the country. Communication and travel have been badly hit by the disaster, and at the moment the true cost in human life and property can only be guessed.

The most damaged city is Sendai, about 400 kilometers away from Tokyo. Commissioner Makoto Yoshida, leader of The Salvation Army’s Japan Territory, was at territorial headquarters in Tokyo and reports: ‘Our building swayed tremendously. It was hard for us to keep standing and many of us were really frightened.’

He adds: ‘We are sending a team to Sendai tonight [11 March] and tomorrow we will start providing the basic necessities as well as assessing the level of damage so we can decide what else we can do.’

Public transport in Tokyo stopped because of the earthquake, leaving many commuters unable to leave work. Commissioner Yoshida says: ‘We opened our hall on the ground floor of territorial headquarters to those who could not go home. We served them with hot drinks and packed meals.’

General Shaw Clifton, the international leader of The Salvation Army, has already been in touch with the commissioner to assure him of the prayers and support of Salvationists around the world.

The Salvation Army has been in Japan since 1895 and currently operates over 80 locations within the country. According to their website, they have dispatched emergency relief workers who are currently assisting with victims and first responders. As we receive more updates from the field, we will be sure to pass those along to you. We ask that you continue to pray for the people affected by this catastrophic event and for those performing search and rescue for the hundreds missing.

Currently, those interested in aiding the relief effort are encouraged to give monetary donations. Monetary funds offer great flexibility and enable local disaster responders to purchase exactly what is needed as close to the disaster zone as possible.

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Copyright 2011 The Salvation Army